Dating furniture 20th century

These properties make them dimensionally stable, hardwearing, rot and insect resistant, and when new, highly fragrant. First the panel, originally complete, is subject to cut-out sections, followed by further reduction to what may appear to be simply decorative brackets.The density and toughness of the wood also allows furniture to be built without the use of glue and nail, but rather constructed from joinery and doweling alone. Further refinement of the same pattern lead the shape of the decorative brackets being incorporated into the shape of the surrounding frame and simultaneously the two mitered vertical pieces comprising a corner become one solid piece.During the Ming and Qing dynasties previous bans on imports were lifted, allowing for larger quantities and varieties of woods to flood in from other parts of Asia. Due to overlogging for the said furniture, most of the species are either threatened or endangered.The use of denser wood led to much finer work, including more elaborate joinery. Construction of traditional wooden Chinese furniture is based primarily of solid wood pieces connected solely using woodworking joints, and rarely using glue or metallic nails.By the next two Dynasties (the Northern and Southern Song) the use of varying types of furniture, including chairs, benches, and stools was common throughout Chinese society.

Taller versions evolved into higher tables as well.Until about the 10th century CE the Chinese sat on mats or low platforms using low tables, in typical Asian style, but then gradually moved to using high tables with chairs.Chinese furniture is mostly in plain polished wood, but from at least the Song dynasty the most luxurious pieces often used lacquer to cover the whole or parts of the visible areas.The folding stool also proliferated similarly, after it was adapted from designs developed by nomadic tribes to the North and West, who used them for both their convenience and light weight in many applications such as mounting horses.Later, woven hourglass-shaped stools evolved; a design still in use today throughout China.

Leave a Reply